tyrannosaur

Nanuqsaurus in the Garden of Ancient Plants.
A female Nanuqsaurus took a strange turn along the ancestral Colville River and finds herself feeling very small indeed among the towering giant plants of an ancient garden forgotten by time - a remnant of a warmer, wetter period of Alaska dominated by ferns, cycads, Bennettitales, dawn redwoods, and Ginkgoes, with interloping stands of flowering ginger plants as a reminder of the changing order of things.
Calligraphy of the anatomical names of bones in the tyrannosaur skull.

Arguably, the two most prominent bones in the head of a Tyrannosaur are the dentary in the mandible and the jugal, just beneath the orbit where the eye resides. Sure, a case can be made for the nasal or the maxilla (from which, with the premaxilla, the top teeth erupt), but look at this image I made which proves that completely wrong.

No, in the tyrant “lizard,” the jugal and the dentary are King. And if you could separate them and weigh them, the dentary would likely be even kingier, out-kinging even the mighty jugal. But is that likely to be the case with all tyrannosaurids? All dinosaurs? All skulls? Let’s find out.

Available on shirts, mugs and other things in:

Mugs:

 

Calligraphy of the anatomical names of bones in the tyrannosaur skull, in color.

 

Two days' work of sweating out hand-lettering to make it legible and accurate. Worth it? I think so. But I made this, so I'm perhaps biased. 

Lesser Bowertyrant (Gorgosaurus libratus)

A speculative look at the behaviors and habits of long-gone creatures, submitted for Irregular Books’ “All Yesterdays” contest:

Gorgosaurus libratus – the lesser bowertyrant – courts a potential mate by constructing bowers of bone and driftwood and offering trophies of previous hunts or scavenging expeditions while displaying his iridescent feathers.

Download the book All Your Yesterdays by C.M. Kosemen, Darren Naish, and John Conway.

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