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From the World of Raven & Scott

An Elasmosaurus spp. skeleton haunts the same waters as Enchodus spp.

This image begins a nearly eight-year attempt to start and then finish a complete Elasmosaurus skeletal.

Citations:


Augusta, J., & Burian, Z. (1964). Prehistoric sea monsters. P. Hamlyn.

Callaway, J. M., & Nicholls, E. L. (Eds.). (1997). Ancient marine reptiles. Academic Press.

[Ch. 6 and 7.]

Carroll, R. L. (1988). Vertebrate Paleontology And Evolution. W. H. Freeman and Company.


Ellis, R. (1985). The book of whales. Alfred a Knopf Inc.


Everhart, M. J. (2017). Oceans of Kansas: a natural history of the Western Interior Sea. Indiana University Press.

[Ch.7.]

Parksosaurus dances in front of a field of flowering Cretaceous era plants

An electric blue Parksosaurus warreni “dances” among a wide variety of flowering plants known from different locations across Alaska and Russia during the Cretaceous era. While we are most familiar with the Pleistocene-era Bering land bridge connecting North America and Eurasia, evidence of many shared fossil plant and animal species show Alaska also bridged the continents during the late Cretaceous.

Nanuqsaurus in the Garden of Ancient Plants.
A female Nanuqsaurus took a strange turn along the ancestral Colville River and finds herself feeling very small indeed among the towering giant plants of an ancient garden forgotten by time - a remnant of a warmer, wetter period of Alaska dominated by ferns, cycads, Bennettitales, dawn redwoods, and Ginkgoes, with interloping stands of flowering ginger plants as a reminder of the changing order of things.
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